I Remember

November 11, 2009

 

To my Dad and my Brother who served in Asia, Europe, and Africa,

To my Uncles and Cousins who served in Vietnam, Korea, and WW II,

To my Grandfather who served in World War I,

and

To all U.S. Veterans

Thank You For Your Service to Our Nation.

God Bless You. Always.

Advertisements

The King’s Commission

November 9, 2009

crownQuote from the Pleasing Pain blog:

“No messenger of a king bearing the king’s message ever waited to earn his right share the word from his king.  He shared it, because that was his duty!  So too, all Christians are ambassadors for Christ, and it is our joy to share the gospel with as many as we can.  If Christ has given us approval to go out into the world and make disciples of all nations, we need not earn another’s approval to share the gospel, the message of our king.” (Emphasis added)

Matthew 28: 16-20


The Cause of the Fort Hood Shooting Spree

November 8, 2009

“For from within, out of the heart of man, come evil thoughts, sexual immorality, theft, murder, adultery, coveting, wickedness, deceit, sensuality, envy, slander, pride, foolishness. All these evil things come from within, and they defile a person.” (Matthew 7: 21-23)

Inside the Heart


Happy Reformation Day

October 31, 2009

Here I Stand Free MP3 download of Martin Luther’s Here I Stand by Max McClean is available from ListenersBible.com. Offer ends Nov 1.

Quote:

In the late afternoon of April 18, 1521, in the city of Worms, Germany, Martin Luther, a 37 year-old Catholic monk was called to defend himself before Charles the Fifth, the Holy Roman Emperor. The speech he delivered that day, Here I Stand, marked the beginning of the Reformation, a critical turning point in Christian history, that decisively altered the spiritual map of the world.

In this recording, Max McLean introduces the events leading up to the Diet of Worms: Martin Luther’s prayer the night before he delivered his speech; Luther’s stirring defense; the Catholic church’s rebuttal; and, Luther’s final heartfelt response.


We Must All Up and Be Doing

October 18, 2009

Selina Hastings

 

 “I dread slack hands in the vineyard — we must all up and be doing.”  — Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon

MP3 Audio about this remarkable Christian woman available for download here. (Source: The Christian Institute, UK)


What Man Means For Evil II

October 18, 2009

Big Brother is Watching

Back in January I posted this article about “China’s 50 Cent Army”. Now, according to some reports, the U.S. Justice Department is up to much the same thing.

That’s the bad news.

The good news is we now have more opportunity than ever before to share the Gospel…

Quote:

…“Let’s say you live in China the U.S. Your every move is monitored. Big Brother is watching and you know it. You work for the Chinese U.S. government and your job is to infiltrate chat rooms, message boards, and comment areas on the Internet in order to spread propaganda.” (Read the Rest)


The Grace of Prayer

October 13, 2009

Richard Sibbes “Some are loath to do good because they feel their hearts rebelling, and duties turn out badly. We should not avoid good actions because of the infirmities attending them. Christ looks more at the good in them which he means to cherish than the ill in them which he means to abolish. Though eating increases a disease, a sick man will still eat, so that nature may gain strength against the disease. So, though sin cleaves to what we do, yet let us do it, since we have to deal with so good a Lord, and the more strife we meet with, the more acceptance we shall have. Christ loves to taste of the good fruits that come from us, even though they will always savor of our old nature.”

“A Christian complains he cannot pray. `Oh, I am troubled with so many distracting thoughts, and never more than now!’ But has he put into your heart a desire to pray? Then he will hear the desires of his own Spirit in you. `We know not what we should pray for as we ought’ (nor how to do anything else as we ought), but the Spirit helps our infirmities with `groanings which cannot be uttered’ (Rom. 8:26), which are not hid from God. `My groaning is not hid from thee’ (Psa. 38:9). God can pick sense out of a confused prayer. These desires cry louder in his ears than your sins. Sometimes a Christian has such confused thoughts that he can say nothing but, as a child, cries, `O Father’, not able to express what he needs, like Moses at the Red Sea. These stirrings of spirit touch the heart of God and melt him into compassion towards us, when they come from the Spirit of adoption, and from a striving to be better.”

“`Oh, but is it possible’, thinks the misgiving heart, `that so holy a God should accept such a prayer?’ Yes, he will accept that which is his own, and pardon that which is ours. Jonah prayed in the fish’s belly (Jon. 2:1), being burdened with the guilt of sin, yet God heard him. Let not, therefore, infirmities discourage us. James takes away this objection (James 5:17). Some might object, `If I were as holy as Elijah, then my prayers might be regarded.’ `But,’ says he, ‘Elijah was a man subject to like passions as we are.’ He had his passions as well as we, or do we think that God heard him because he was without fault? Surely not. But look at the promises: `Call upon me in the day of trouble: I will deliver thee’ (Psa. 50:15). `Ask, and it shall be given you’ (Matt. 7:7) and others like these. God accepts our prayers, though weak, because we are his own children, and they come from his own Spirit; because they are according to his own will; and because they are offered in Christ’s mediation, and he takes them, and mingles them with his own incense (Rev. 8:3).”

“There is never a holy sigh, never a tear we shed, which is lost. And as every grace increases by exercise of itself, so does the grace of prayer. By prayer we learn to pray. So, likewise, we should take heed of a spirit of discouragement in all other holy duties, since we have so gracious a Saviour. Pray as we are able, hear as we are able, strive as we are able, do as we are able, according to the measure of grace received. God in Christ will cast a gracious eye upon that which is his own.”

Extract from The Bruised Reed by Richard Sibbes.